About

First of all, thank you for visiting my site and clicking the about link. This site was launched at the end of July 2018 and somehow it took off. I just wanted to write about skateboarding from my perspective, my experience, and keep it real.

About Ruben Vee

In short; I’m a nearing my 40’s, confused if I should call myself a millennial or Gen Xer, work as a (part-time) lead designer in the tech industry and I graduated as an art student (media and technology).

I’m blessed with a lovely family and survived a burn-out…I think. Oh, I’m Dutch (The Netherlands, Europe) so my Engrish may sometimes seem a bit off.

Still Here? Alright, Time to Confess

I started this site to share the one thing that eases my mind, skateboarding! My brain stops thinking about all the what if’s when I drop in (except what if I hurt myself). Skateboarding is a way of life, some say it’s an art, others say it’s for kids. All I know is that I feel great and full of energy when I come back from a good session.

Another reason I’m so passionate about this website is the utter trash and bad guides that come up on Google. I try to provide honest unbiased content and write the best possible answers to frequently asked questions. It’s a mix of personal experience, opinion, and proper research.

How I Ended up Skateboarding

me skateboarding in 2003

I’ve been skateboarding for a while now, I started skateboarding in 1989, just sitting on a skateboard with one knee on the board and pushing with your other foot. My cheap toy skateboard couldn’t handle ollies and I had no clue how to even do that stuff. I think my first ‘real’ skateboard even had fake Schmitt Sticks and these weird copers. There was just no one around to show me how, but I loved my board despite its limitations.

Fast forward to 1995.  I started inline skating but after watching the local skateboarders, and finally understanding how to ollie, I was quickly convinced to buy a real skateboard.  I did both for a few years but dedicated myself to skateboarding eventually.

In 1996 we got permission from our local government to build our own mini ramp/vert made out of wood, it was amazing. Biggest mini/vert combo in my country at that time.

We maintained it ourselves as best as we could with our limited budgets. The local government subsidized the ramp but didn’t pay for maintenance. It was great and made so many friends which I still see and hold dear to this day. Plans changed and it was decided that the vert had to move (hence destroyed) to make room for something else.

The local officials promised we would get a new place and a new mini ramp vert. Nothing ever happened. The ramp/vert was demolished and it took 10 years before they actually gave us a new skate park. 10 freaking years! We all grew up, skateboarding died over here because there was just no one to inspire a new generation.

I moved out of my local town, went to art school, and my new town had no facilities for skateboarders. No skate parks, horrible streets, and I just cruised once every while. I could ignore skating for a few years. Once a skateboarder, always a skateboarder. It haunted me in my sleep and it wouldn’t stop.

Getting Back into Skateboarding

Fast forward to 2015. My wife and I decided to move back to our roots. The houses were cheaper, the town is small and safe, perfect for our son, so we did it. Funny thing is that when I moved back, the local government finally decided to bring back the ‘skatepark’. 

I love to skate mini ramp and my local ramp is the best mini ramp ever. It’s close to my home so I decided to pick up where I left. It’s full of scooter kids, and I rarely see a skateboarder there. Only when my friends visit we relive the old days and I love the feeling that nothing really ever changed. 

Our bellies aren’t tight anymore, less hair, and we’re just kids with lots of responsibilities I guess, but we will always be those skater kids people frowned upon.